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Thursday, February 13, 2014

Deconstructing Turkey

David P. Goldman (aka "Spengler") discusses the current and future economic mess unfolding in Turkey. Politically, the alliance that built Erdogan's power base is coming apart at the seams. Goldman writes:
Erdogan was always a loose cannon. Now he has become unmoored. Paranoia is endemic in Turkish politics because so much of it is founded on conspiracy. The expression “paranoid Turk” is a pleonasm. Islamist followers of the self-styled prophet Fetullah Gulen infiltrated the security services and helped Erdogan jail some of the country’s top military commanders on dubious allegations of a coup plot. Last August a Turkish court sentenced some 275 alleged members of the “Ergenekon” coup plot, including dozens of military officers, journalists, and secular leaders of civil society.

Now Gulen has broken with Erdogan and his security apparatus has uncovered massive documentation of corruption in the Erdogan administration. Erdogan is firing police and security officials as fast as they arrest his cronies.
(Underline added).
In the meantime, Turkey has entered a perfect storm. As its currency plunges, import costs soar, which means that a current account of 8% of GDP will shortly turn into 10% to 12% of GDP – unless the country stops importing, which means a drastic fall in economic activity. As its currency falls, its cost of borrowing jumps, which means that the cost of servicing existing debt will compound its current financing requirements. The only cure for Erdogan’s debt addiction, to borrow a phrase, is cold turkey.

The vicious cycle will end when valuations are sufficiently low and the government is sufficiently cooperative to sell assets at low prices to foreign investors, and when Turkish workers accept lower wages to produce products for export.
 Goldman suggests that Turkey could see a future as an assembly hub for products with parts manufactured in China, to be exported to Europe. But Erdogan has alienated the professionals and business people that could probably make this happen. Instead, Goldman predicts that Erdogan will rely more and more on his most hard-core supporters to stay in power.

... In some ways Turkey’s decline is more dangerous than the Syrian civil war, or the low-intensity civil conflict in Iraq or Egypt. Turkey held the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s eastern flank for more than six decades, and all parties in the region – including Russia – counted on Turkey to help maintain regional stability. Turkey no longer contributes to crisis management. It is another crisis to be managed.

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