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Thursday, June 7, 2012

It's Not an Issue of Tolerance

Alexander Pope penned the following lines:
Vice is a monster of so frightful mien,
As to be hated needs but to be seen;
Yet seen too oft, becomes familiar with her face,
We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
But where th'extreme of Vice was ne'er agreed:
No creature owns it in the first degree,
But thinks his neighbour farther gone than he;
E'vn those who dwell beneath its very zone,
Or never feel the rage or never own;
What happier natures shrink at with affright,
The hard inhabitant contends is right.
The "embrace" portion is the goal of the "gay" rights movement--not tolerance, but that it be embraced, celebrated and incorporated into our lives. And if we want to embrace and celebrate morality as taught in the Bible? Tough luck.

The latest in this regard is the sudden media storm about a petition to the Boy Scouts to change their morality standards. USA Today summarizes this latest media circus:
Michael Jones, deputy campaign director for Change.org, said that more than 275,000 people signed the online petition and that more are continuing to do so.

He said "several thousand" signers were current or former Scouts or Scout leaders. Among those presenting the petition was an Eagle Scout, Zach Wahls, a college student raised by a same-sex couple and author of My Two Moms: Lessons of Love, Strength, and What Makes a Family, Jones said.

Wahls said he presented the petition to the Boy Scouts "because I love the organization and I refuse to stand by idly as it forfeits its cultural relevancy at the very moment this country needs it most," according to a statement by Change.org.

The resolution calls for reinstatement of a lesbian den leader, Jennifer Tyrrell, who it says was removed from her position because of her sexual orientation. She had been a Scout den mother near Bridgeport, Ohio.
The Boy Scouts agreed to consider the petition, which the media took to be an agreement to revisit its position. The BSA subsequently released this statement:
In April, a single individual submitted a resolution asking the Boy Scouts to consider amending its policy on not granting membership to open or avowed homosexuals. The resolution asked that the policy be amended to allow local units to determine their own standards.
Scouting's voting members may submit resolutions, which represent that individual's personal viewpoint, for consideration at the national annual business meeting. As directed by its bylaws, on May 31, the BSA assigned the resolution to a committee that will consider the resolution and present a report to the National Executive Board.
Resolutions and petitions on this subject are not unique and go back as far as 2000, when the U.S. Supreme Court reviewed this matter, and have been widely covered in the media since that time. In addition, in the past individuals have submitted resolutions asking the BSA to reaffirm its current policy. Those resolutions were handled in the same manner.
The introduction of a resolution is procedural and handled with respect but does not indicate the organization is "reviewing a policy" or signal a change in direction. 
In April, a single individual submitted a resolution asking the Boy Scouts to consider amending its policy on not granting membership to open or avowed homosexuals. The resolution asked that the policy be amended to allow local units to determine their own standards.
Scouting's voting members may submit resolutions, which represent that individual's personal viewpoint, for consideration at the national annual business meeting. As directed by its bylaws, on May 31, the BSA assigned the resolution to a committee that will consider the resolution and present a report to the National Executive Board.
Resolutions and petitions on this subject are not unique and go back as far as 2000, when the U.S. Supreme Court reviewed this matter, and have been widely covered in the media since that time. In addition, in the past individuals have submitted resolutions asking the BSA to reaffirm its current policy. Those resolutions were handled in the same manner.
The introduction of a resolution is procedural and handled with respect but does not indicate the organization is "reviewing a policy" or signal a change in direction. 
In April, a single individual submitted a resolution asking the Boy Scouts to consider amending its policy on not granting membership to open or avowed homosexuals. The resolution asked that the policy be amended to allow local units to determine their own standards.

Scouting's voting members may submit resolutions, which represent that individual's personal viewpoint, for consideration at the national annual business meeting. As directed by its bylaws, on May 31, the BSA assigned the resolution to a committee that will consider the resolution and present a report to the National Executive Board.

Resolutions and petitions on this subject are not unique and go back as far as 2000, when the U.S. Supreme Court reviewed this matter, and have been widely covered in the media since that time. In addition, in the past individuals have submitted resolutions asking the BSA to reaffirm its current policy. Those resolutions were handled in the same manner.

The introduction of a resolution is procedural and handled with respect but does not indicate the organization is "reviewing a policy" or signal a change in direction.
The BSA also reiterated its position:
The BSA policy is: "While the BSA does not proactively inquire about the sexual orientation of employees, volunteers, or members, we do not grant membership to individuals who are open or avowed homosexuals or who engage in behavior that would become a distraction to the mission of the BSA."

Scouting believes same-sex attraction should be introduced and discussed outside of its program with parents, caregivers, or spiritual advisers, at the appropriate time and in the right setting. The vast majority of parents we serve value this right and do not sign their children up for Scouting for it to introduce or discuss, in any way, these topics.

The BSA is a voluntary, private organization that sets policies that are best for the organization. The BSA welcomes all who share its beliefs but does not criticize or condemn those who wish to follow a different path.
This was not accepted very well by the liberal media. For instance, Time Magazine waxed sarcastic:
For 102 years, the Boys Scouts of America has excluded homosexual boys and adult volunteers with such unapologetic conviction that one has to wonder if there’s a badge for that. But after coming under fire for ousting an openly gay den mother, the organization says it’s considering a resolution to end its contentious membership policy.
* * *
The comparatively progressive Girls Scouts of America, by contrast, maintains a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy on homosexuality and, as of last year, is inclusive of transgender youth. A statement by the Girls Scouts of Colorado, which accepted its first biologically male member in 2011, summed up the organization’s position thusly: ”If a child identifies as a girl and the child’s family presents her as a girl, Girl Scouts of Colorado welcomes her as a Girl Scout.”
So, in the eyes of Time Magazine, if you hold Christian (or Muslim) beliefs about the morality of homosexuality, you are backward and ignorant. But if you agree with the liberal media's chosen viewpoint, you are "progressive" and "inclusive." No matter that being "inclusive" will actually be "exclusive" toward most of the members. (It's bad enough that the BSA has become a willing partner in propagandizing the anti-human enviro-wacko religion).
 
And while Obama desperately wants the campaign donations that homosexuals will contribute (so much so that he is willing to tell filthy jokes about his wife at a gay fundraiser), gay marriage is not going over too well within the black religious community. (Perhaps another example of Obama showing how little he actually relates to African Americans).

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